How Much Caffeine Should You Drink Each Day?

Congratulations on your pregnancy! This is an exciting time in your life, and you should be sure to take care of yourself both mentally and physically. One important aspect of prenatal health is caffeine consumption. 

How much caffeine is too much? How can you drink coffee without overdoing it? Today we will answer these questions and provide some tips for prenatal caffeine consumption.

What Is Caffeine and Where Does It Come From?

Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant. It is found in coffee, tea, soda, chocolate, and energy drinks. Caffeine can also be added to certain medications. Caffeine is absorbed into the bloodstream and then travels to the brain. There it works by blocking adenosine, a neurotransmitter that makes you feel tired. This increases alertness and energy.

How Much Caffeine Is Safe During Pregnancy?

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends that pregnant women limit their caffeine intake to less than 200 mg per day. This is equivalent to about 3 shots of espresso or 3 cups of light to medium roast coffee. 

However, every woman’s pregnancy is different, and some may be more sensitive to caffeine than others. It is important to listen to your body and talk to your healthcare provider about what is right for you.

What Are the Risks of Drinking Too Much Caffeine during Pregnancy?

Drinking too much caffeine in any condition could lead to several health risks. During pregnancy, these risks could be amplified. Some of the risks associated with high caffeine consumption during pregnancy include:

  • Dehydration: Caffeine is a diuretic, which means it makes you urinate more frequently. This can lead to dehydration, which is dangerous for both mother and baby.
  • Insomnia: Caffeine can make it difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep. This is important because sleep is crucial for both mother and baby during pregnancy.
  • Anxiety: Caffeine can cause anxiety, which is already a common symptom of pregnancy.
  • High blood pressure: Caffeine can raise blood pressure, which can be dangerous for both mother and baby.
  • Preterm labor: Some studies have shown that high caffeine intake during pregnancy can lead to preterm labor. Preterm labor is when labor begins before 37 weeks of pregnancy.
  • Low birth weight: Some studies have shown that high caffeine intake during pregnancy can lead to low birth weight. Low birth weight is when a baby is born weighing less than five pounds, eight ounces.
  • Miscarriage: Some studies have shown that high caffeine intake during pregnancy can lead to miscarriage.
  • Increased heart rate: Caffeine can cause an increased heart rate, which can be dangerous for both mother and baby
  • Restlessness: Caffeine can cause restlessness, which can be dangerous for both mother and baby.
  • Nausea and vomiting: Caffeine can cause nausea and vomiting, which can be dangerous for both mother and baby.
  • Diarrhea: Caffeine can cause diarrhea, which can lead to dehydration. Dehydration is dangerous for both mother and baby.
  • Frequent urination: Caffeine can cause frequent urination, which can lead to dehydration. Dehydration is dangerous for both mother and baby.

How Can You Drink Coffee Without Overdoing It?

If you’re like most people, cutting out coffee entirely is not realistic (or desirable!). So how can you enjoy your cup of joe without overdoing it on the caffeine? Here are a few tips:

1. Drink coffee earlier in the day. Caffeine stays in your system for about six hours, so if you drink it in the evening, it may interfere with your sleep.

2. Choose decaf. Decaf coffee still has some caffeine, but it is much less than regular coffee. You can also find decaf teas and sodas.

3. Limit other sources of caffeine. If you’re drinking coffee, try to limit other sources of caffeine like tea, soda, and chocolate.

4. Listen to your body. If you feel jittery or anxious after drinking coffee, it may be an indication that you are sensitive to caffeine and should cut back.

5. Try espresso instead. The average cup of coffee has between 60-120 milligrams of caffeine depending on the roast you choose. Whereas a shot of espresso is measured for better dietary management with each ounce weighing in at 70 milligrams of caffeine.

In Closing: More Pregnancy Wellness Tips

We hope this article has helped answer your questions about prenatal caffeine consumption. Remember to listen to your body and talk to your healthcare provider about what is right for you. Here are a few more tips for prenatal wellness:

1. Eat healthy foods: Eating healthy foods is important for both mother and baby. Be sure to eat plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

2. Get regular exercise: Exercise is important for prenatal health. Walking, swimming, and prenatal yoga are all great options.

3. Take prenatal vitamins: Prenatal vitamins are important for both mother and baby. Be sure to talk to your doctor about the best prenatal vitamin for you.

4. Get enough sleep: Sleep is crucial for both mother and baby during pregnancy. Be sure to get at least eight hours of sleep each night.

Also, if you’re trying to cut back on caffeine, there are plenty of alternative beverages you can enjoy during pregnancy. This can include herbal tea, fruit juice, milk, and water. Find what works best for you and enjoy this special time in your life.

 

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